Posts for: February, 2017

By Michael J Morris, DDS
February 16, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
WatchOutforRe-InfectionAfteraRootCanalTreatment

So, you've undergone a root canal treatment to save a decayed tooth. The tooth has a new lease on life — and the pain is gone too. But there's a reality you need to keep in mind — your tooth could become re-infected, putting you back in the same painful circumstance.

Root canal treatments are often necessary when decay works its way deep within a tooth, into the pulp. The excruciating pain a person feels is the infection attacking the bundle of nerves within the pulp tissue. If the infection isn't addressed promptly, it will continue to work its way to the root, eventually damaging the tooth beyond repair.

During a root canal treatment, we drill into the tooth to access the pulp chamber. After clearing it completely of its infected tissue, we then fill the chamber and root canals with a special filling and then seal off the access. A short time later we'll bond a crown over the tooth to protect it and to make it more attractive.

Most of the time, this preserves the tooth for many years. Occasionally, though, re-infection can occur. There are a number of reasons why: the first infection may have been more extensive than thought; the root canal network was more complex and some tinier canals weren't able to be identified; or the protective crown may once again get tooth decay contaminating the root canal.

If infection does reoccur it doesn't mean the tooth is lost. It's possible a second root canal treatment can successfully correct any problems, especially those that may not have been detected the first time. More complex cases might also require the services of an endodontist, a specialist in root canals. They're skilled in advanced techniques and have specialized equipment to handle even the most complicated root canal networks.

In the meantime, if you notice signs of re-infection like pain or swelling around a treated tooth, contact us promptly for an appointment. You should also contact us if the tooth is injured in an accident. The sooner we can treat your tooth, the more likely the second time will be more successful.

If you would like more information on preserving a tooth through root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment: How long will it Last?


By Michael J Morris, DDS
February 03, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures

Have a damaged tooth? A dental crown will make your tooth strong and beautiful again. Dr. Michael Morris uses high-quality dental dental crownscrowns at his practice in Spring, TX, as a solution for restoring teeth that have been damaged or weakened. Here's everything you've ever wanted to know about dental crowns.

What is a Dental Crown?

Dental crowns are tooth-shaped caps that are placed over teeth -- to cover the teeth, or restore their size, strength and shape, and improve their appearance and alignment. When cemented into place, the dental crowns fully cover the visible portion the teeth that lie above the gum line.

Uses For Dental Crowns

When a tooth has a fracture or cavity that involves half the width of the tooth or more, it needs to be covered with a dental crown. This is because the remaining tooth is so weak that it is prone to fracture. Teeth that have had a root canal need to be restored with dental crowns to prevent them from fracturing. Dental crowns are also used to cover dental implants and hold dental bridges in place.

The Benefits of Crowns

Teeth that have been weakened can be saved by covering them with a dental crown. Dental crowns will make your weakened and damaged teeth stronger and improve their appearance. Dental crowns can help you chew better. They can also improve your clarity of speech. Dental crowns are strong and durable and they will restore full function of your damaged teeth.

The Cost of a Dental Crown

The cost of getting a dental crown can vary on the materials used, local rates and the location and condition of the tooth. Insurance will typically cover part of the expense, but the amount varies with each insurer and plan. An individual should expect to pay between $600 and $2,000 for a dental crown.

Ready to flash a perfect smile? If you have teeth that are damaged due to trauma, periodontal disease, or decay, call Dr. Morris to schedule an appointment. With dental crowns, our world-class Spring, TX, dentist can take your smile from being so-so to simply stunning.


By Michael J Morris, DDS
February 01, 2017
Category: Oral Health
ActorDavidRamseySaysDontForgettoFloss

Can you have healthy teeth and still have gum disease? Absolutely! And if you don’t believe us, just ask actor David Ramsey. The cast member of TV hits such as Dexter and Arrow said in a recent interview that up to the present day, he has never had a single cavity. Yet at a routine dental visit during his college years, Ramsey’s dentist pointed out how easily his gums bled during the exam. This was an early sign of periodontal (gum) disease, the dentist told him.

“I learned that just because you don’t have cavities, doesn’t mean you don’t have periodontal disease,” Ramsey said.

Apparently, Ramsey had always been very conscientious about brushing his teeth but he never flossed them.

“This isn’t just some strange phenomenon that exists just in my house — a lot of people who brush don’t really floss,” he noted.

Unfortunately, that’s true — and we’d certainly like to change it. So why is flossing so important?

Oral diseases such as tooth decay and periodontal disease often start when dental plaque, a bacteria-laden film that collects on teeth, is allowed to build up. These sticky deposits can harden into a substance called tartar or calculus, which is irritating to the gums and must be removed during a professional teeth cleaning.

Brushing teeth is one way to remove soft plaque, but it is not effective at reaching bacteria or food debris between teeth. That’s where flossing comes in. Floss can fit into spaces that your toothbrush never reaches. In fact, if you don’t floss, you’re leaving about a third to half of your tooth surfaces unclean — and, as David Ramsey found out, that’s a path to periodontal disease.

Since then, however, Ramsey has become a meticulous flosser, and he proudly notes that the long-ago dental appointment “was the last we heard of any type of gum disease.”

Let that be the same for you! Just remember to brush and floss, eat a good diet low in sugar, and come in to the dental office for regular professional cleanings.

If you would like more information on flossing or periodontal disease, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Understanding Gum (Periodontal) Disease.”




Louetta and Spring, TX Family Dentist
Michael J Morris, DDS
9318 Louetta Road Suite 600
Spring, TX 77379
(281) 379-6939
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