Posts for: October, 2021

BuffaloBillsStefonDiggsKnowsTheresNeveraBadPlacetoFloss

Buffalo Bills wide receiver Stefon Diggs wrapped up the NFL regular season in January, setting single-season records in both catches and receiving yards. The Bills handily beat the Miami Dolphins, earning themselves the second seed in the AFC playoffs, and Diggs certainly did his part, making 7 catches for 76 yards. But what set the internet ablaze was not Diggs' accomplishments on the field but rather what the camera caught him doing on the sidelines—flossing his teeth!

The Twitterverse erupted with Bills fans poking fun at Diggs. But Diggs is not ashamed of his good oral hygiene habits, and CBS play-by-play announcer Kevin Harlan expressed his support with “Dental hygiene is something to take note of, kids! There's never a bad place to floss” and “When you lead the NFL in catches and yards, you can floss anytime you want.”

We like to think so. There's an old joke among dentists:
Q. Which teeth do you need to floss?
A. Only the ones you want to keep.

Although this sounds humorous, it is borne out in research. Of note, a 2017 study showed that people who floss have a lower risk of tooth loss over periods of 5 years and 10 years, and a 2020 study found that older adults who flossed lost an average of 1 tooth in 5 years, while those who don't lost around 4 teeth in the same time period.

We in the dental profession stress the importance of flossing as a daily habit—and Stefon Diggs would likely agree—yet fewer than 1 in 3 Americans floss every day. The 2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), conducted by the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, revealed that only 30% of Americans floss every day, while 37% floss less than every day and 32% never floss.

The biggest enemy on the football field may be the opposing team, but the biggest enemy to your oral health is plaque, a sticky film of bacteria and food debris that builds up on tooth surfaces. Plaque can cause tooth decay and gum disease, the number one cause of tooth loss among adults. Flossing is necessary to remove plaque from between teeth and around the gums where a toothbrush can't reach. If not removed, plaque hardens into tartar, which can only be removed by the specialized tools used in the dental office. Regular professional dental cleanings are also needed to get at those hard-to-reach spots you may have missed.

If Diggs can find time to floss during a major NFL game, the rest of us can certainly find a couple minutes a day to do it. While we might not recommend Diggs' technique of flossing from one side of the mouth to the other, we commend his enthusiasm and commitment to keeping his teeth and gums healthy. Along with good dental hygiene at home—or on the sidelines if you are Stefon Diggs—regular professional dental cleanings and checkups play a key role in maintaining a healthy smile for life.

If you would like more information about keeping in the best dental health, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”


By Michael J Morris, DDS
October 15, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral hygiene   dentures  
DoThese2ThingsForYourHealthsSakeIfYouWearDentures

Today's dentures are more comfortable, more functional and more life-like than ever before—so much so that you might forget you have them in. Even so, dentures do have some downsides, and constant wear only amplifies those.

Our biggest concern is the effect dentures can have on bone health. Older bone is constantly replaced by newer bone, and the forces generated while chewing help stimulate this new growth. When a tooth is lost, however, this growth stimulus vanishes with it for that area of the bone. This may result in a slower growth rate, which can eventually lead to lost bone volume and density.

Dentures can't restore this lost stimulus, and may even make the situation worse. That's because traditional dentures rest on the bony ridges of the gums where the teeth once were. This can put pressure on the underlying bone, which can accelerate bone loss—and even more so when wearers leave their dentures in continuously.

Dentures can also contribute to disease if they're not regularly removed and cleaned. Besides oral yeast infections, bacteria-laden dentures can contribute to the production of a protein called interleukin-6 produced by the white blood cells. If a significant amount of this protein passes into the blood stream, it can increase body-wide inflammation and foster a systemic environment conducive to serious diseases like pneumonia.

If you wear dentures, then, it's good for your health (oral and otherwise) to incorporate two practices into your daily life. The first is to remove your dentures at night while you sleep. Not only will this help slow the progression of bone loss, it will also give your gums a chance to rest and recover from denture wear.

It's also important to regularly clean your dentures, either with an antibacterial soap or a special denture cleanser. During storage, keep your dentures in clean water or a peroxide-based solution designed for dentures. This will reduce the accumulation of bacteria on your dentures that can cause disease.

Dentures restore the dental function and smile appearance that a person loses with their teeth. Taking care of your dentures (and giving your mouth a daily rest from them) will help promote good oral and general health for you and a longer life for your dentures.

If you would like more information on denture care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sleeping in Dentures.”


By Michael J Morris, DDS
October 05, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
IfYouFindFlossingTooDifficultTryaWaterFlosser

Dental plaque, that gritty bacterial film coating your teeth, is the top cause for tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. You can see and feel a lot of it—but not all of it. Some deposits can lodge snugly between your teeth, and can cause dental disease just as much as what's out in the open.

The problem with between-teeth plaque is that even a solid brushing habit might not effectively remove it. That's why you flossing should also be part of your daily oral hygiene.

If the thought of flossing, however, causes you to let out an audible sigh, we understand. Flossing typically engenders less enthusiasm than brushing, mainly because many find flossing time consuming and difficult to do.

If traditional flossing isn't your bag, we may have a reasonable alternative. Oral irrigation is a hygiene method for removing plaque between teeth using a pressurized water spray. You direct the water spray between your teeth using a handheld wand (which somewhat resembles a power toothbrush) and small hose attached to a countertop pump appliance.

A mainstay in dental offices, oral irrigators (or water flossers) have been available for home use since the 1960s. They're ideal for people who have problems with manual dexterity or who may not want to contend with flossing thread. They also make it easier for patients wearing braces to clean between their teeth, a monumental task using regular floss.

As to effectiveness, oral irrigation appears to match that of regular flossing, especially for orthodontic patients. Clinical studies in the early 2000s compared patients with braces using oral irrigation with those who were brushing only. Those using irrigation were able to remove five times as much plaque as the other group.

There are a number of comparable oral irrigation brands on the market from which to choose, and your dentist can advise you on features to look for when purchasing one. Just be sure you're using some method, oral irrigation or traditional flossing, to remove disease-causing plaque from between your teeth—either will go a long way in keeping your teeth and gums healthy.

If you would like more information on flossing methods, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cleaning Between Your Teeth.”




Louetta and Spring, TX Family Dentist
Michael J Morris, DDS
9318 Louetta Road Suite 600
Spring, TX 77379
(281) 379-6939
Family Dentist in Spring and Louetta, TX Call For Pricing Options

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